Identify PPID in Horses

The clinical signs of PPID in horses can be subtle, so it’s important to know what to look for. This can help get an early diagnosis and help the affected horse. Early diagnosis followed by treatment may minimize progression of PPID and prolong the life of the horse.1

 

Clinical signs of PPID vary widely and may be mild or severe. Often, early clinical signs can go unrecognized. But even when a horse has advanced disease, treatment can give him a longer, healthier life.1 Explore below to see which clinical signs are often associated with early versus advanced signs of PPID.

Early sign
Change in attitude/lethargy

A change in personality and/or a lack of energy

Early Sign
Decreased performance

Increased sluggishness compared to normal.

Early Sign
Regional hypertrichosis

Decreased or delayed shedding in specific areas (regions) of the horses body

Early Sign
Delayed hair coat shedding

Delayed shedding of the winter coat may occur in some areas, and the summer coat may look different in these same areas.

Early Sign
Loss of topline muscle

Prominent withers and/or prominent spine

Early & Advanced Sign
Abnormal sweating (increased or decreased)

Increased or decreased sweating may occur.

Early & Advanced Sign
Infertility

Reproductive cycles may be abnormal or absent, potentially leading to infertility.

Early Sign
Desmitis/tendonitis

A cause of lameness in both forelimb and hindlimb of athletic horses.

Early Sign
Regional adiposity

Fat deposits may appear along the crest of the neck and the tail head.

Early Sign
Laminitis

Inflammation of the laminae of the foot and increased tenderness.

Advanced Sign
Dull attitude/altered mentation

Sluggishness or a decreased activity

Advanced Sign
Exercise intolerance

Decreased ability in physical exercise

Advanced Sign
Generalized hypertrichosis

Excessive hair growth over all of the body.

Advanced Sign
Loss of seasonal hair coat shedding

Loss of seasonal shedding compared to herd mates or past years

Advanced Sign
Topline muscle atrophy

Prominent withers, sunken shoulders and/or prominent spine

Advanced Sign
Rounded abdomen

The horse’s belly may have a "rounded" hay belly appearance.

Advanced Sign
Polyuria/polydipsia

Increased urination and/or thirst.

Advanced Sign
Recurrent infections

A few examples are recurring secondary skin infections, hoof abscesses, conjunctivitis and sinusitis.

Advanced Sign
Dry eye/recurrent corneal ulcers

Dry eye or recurrent injuries/infections to the outermost layer of the eye.

Advanced Sign
Increased mammary gland secretions

A discharge from mammary gland in a non-lactating, non-pregnant mare.

Advanced Sign
Regional adiposity (bulging supraorbital fat)

Fat deposits may appear above the eyes.

Advanced Sign
Tendon and suspensory ligament laxity

Tendon laxity may be observed where the fetlock "drops" toward the ground when bearing weight.

Advanced Sign
Laminitis/recurrent sole abscesses

Inflammation of the laminae of the foot and increased tenderness.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: PRASCEND is for use in horses only. Treatment with PRASCEND may cause loss of appetite. Most cases are mild. Weight loss, lack of energy, and behavioral changes also may be observed. If severe, a temporary dose reduction may be necessary. PRASCEND has not been evaluated in breeding, pregnant or lactating horses, and may interfere with reproductive hormones in these horses. PRASCEND tablets should not be crushed due to the potential for increased human exposure. Refer to the package insert for complete product information.