Prascend® (pergolide tablets) Controls the Clinical Signs Associated with PPID1

Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) is one of the most common equine endocrine disorders — but the clinical signs associated with PPID can be controlled with daily treatment. PRASCEND controls the clinical signs of PPID to improve the quality of life of the horse.2

ABOUT PRASCEND
The Most Proven Treatment for PPID

PRASCEND is the most proven treatment available to control the clinical signs associated with PPID in horses.1 The rectangular, half-scored light-red tablets contain 1 mg pergolide as pergolide mesylate and are packaged in blister packs. Keep PRASCEND in a secure location out of reach of dogs, cats, and other animals to prevent accidental ingestion or overdose.

Read More About PRASCEND
ABOUT PPID IN HORSES
How PPID Affects Horses

Pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID), also referred to as equine Cushing’s disease, is one of the most common endocrine disorders in horses.3 PPID causes the horse's pituitary gland, which utilizes hormones to control body functions, to work overtime. This can lead to a variety of problems for horses, ranging from delayed shedding to loss of muscle mass.

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Some Clinical Signs of PPID
Loss of seasonal hair coat shedding
Decreased performance
Change in attitudes
Recurrent infections
Abnormal sweating
Laminitis
See All the Signs
DIAGNOSING
We Can ID PPID

PPID can often go undiagnosed. Because PPID has reportedly been identified in 21% of horses over the age of 15, it was once believed to be only an old horse disease.3 But PPID can affect any horse, and in rare cases, horses as young as five years old have been diagnosed.4 In fact, PPID affects male and female equines, and is seen in many breeds of horses, including ponies.

PPID Management Protocol
Whole-Horse Care

When it comes to treating PPID in horses, the earlier the better. Using PRASCEND as part of PPID management protocol can help reduce the clinical signs of PPID.1 PRASCEND has not been evaluated in breeding, pregnant or lactating horses.
Talk to your veterinarian about creating a management plan for your horse that addresses:

  • Pharmaceutical treatment
  • Diet and exercise
  • Proper vaccination
  • Deworm regularly
  • Regular care from hoof to teeth
  • Body clipping, if needed
PRASCEND TESTIMONIAL

Watch Image’s PPID Story

Horseowner Jennifer Barbour tells the story of her daughter Hailey’s horse, Image, and their experience managing Image’s clinical signs of PPID with PRASCEND. PRASCEND tablets should not be crushed due to the potential for increased human exposure.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: PRASCEND is for use in horses only. PRASCEND has not been evaluated in breeding, pregnant, or lactating horses. Treatment with PRASCEND may cause loss of appetite. Most cases are mild. If severe, a temporary dose reduction may be necessary. Weight loss, lack of energy, and behavioral changes also may be observed. PRASCEND is contraindicated in horses with hypersensitivity to pergolide mesylate or other ergot derivatives. Not for use in humans. Do not ingest the product. PRASCEND tablets should not be crushed due to the potential for increased human exposure. Pergolide, like other ergot derivatives, may cause emesis, dizziness, lethargy or low blood pressure. Pregnant or lactating women should wear gloves when administering this product. Store this product separately away from human medicinal products and handle this product with care to avoid accidental ingestion. Keep PRASCEND in a secure location out of reach of dogs, cats, and other animals to prevent accidental ingestion or overdose. Dogs have eaten PRASCEND tablets that were placed in food intended for horses or dropped during administration of the tablets to the horses. Adverse reactions may occur if animals other than horses ingest PRASCEND tablets. Refer to the package insert for complete product information.